Henle Verlag – April 2015

J. S. Bach: Invention und Sinfonien…
edited by Ullrich Scheideler…
HN 589. ix + 91pp, €18.00.
[HN 590 clothbound, HN 1589 without editorial fingering]

I deliberately ignored the name of the fingerer, and would personally prefer HN 1589. The figuring twists the movement to make everything legato, which is a challenge but a gross oversimplification avoiding variety of texture. Just because a piano usually sounds smoother than a harpsichord, that doesn’t mean that is what you have to do with it. In other respects, though, this is a fine edition, with a thorough editorial commentary. Curiously, the intro­duction is in German, English and French, but the French need to know German or English for the commentary. The unfingered version would be the ideal edition for early performers.


C. Ph. Bach: Flötenkonzert d-moll
Klavierauszug
HN 1207. vi + 37pp, €16.00.

The pedantic reader will wonder why there is no Wq or Helm number. It is one of those concertos that were written for flute or keyboard – in this case, not for cello as well. The keyboard version is Wq 22 or Helm 425. It is now thought that the flute version existed before the keyboard, so there is no need to doubt its authenticity.


Beethoven: Duo fur Violine und Violoncello: fragment
edited and completed by Robert D. Levin.
HN 1265, €10.00.

I find it difficult not to think of it as rather curious piano music – perhaps that would be less obvious if the bar lines only went through the staves. Levin has been a regular completer of the incomplete, and this seems to work well – any pro should be able to manage it. It dates from around 1792.


Mozart: Concerto for Horn and Orchestra in D major with two Rondo versions, K 412/514…
completed and edited by Henrik Wiese
Breitkopf/Henle (P-B 15128). [vi] + 29pp, €22.90.

K.412 is the normal form, though it seems now that it is no longer accepted as K412 but put back to K386b (1782). There is no slow movement. The finale comes in two versions. RV 412 was added by Süssmayr, who includes a quote from the Lamentations of Jeremiah, and was probably performed at Easter in 1782. K514 is the sketchy form of Mozart’s version, with comments written above the horn stave and translated on page v. By that time Leutgeb’s musical range was getting smaller, down to a ninth. The introduction isn’t quite as clear as I expected – perhaps the German was clearer. I presume the Henle involvement is in the horn/piano version: the score is in the Breitkopf manner.

Clifford Bartlett